Tame your computer – crafty conversions

9 Feb

In the first tip of this year I wrote how to use the drag and drop technique to move or copy cells. (It’s here if you missed it.)

The disadvantage of this method is that the Paste Options button won’t be displayed, so you won’t be able to perform special copy and paste operations “on the fly”, (such as converting columns to rows and rows to columns). That said, it still offers a great trick if you want to paste values, not formulas.

Here’s how:

  1. Select the cell(s) that contain the formula.
  2. Point to the border of the selection and wait until the mouse pointer appears as a combination upward-pointing arrow and four-headed arrow.
  3. Press and hold down the right mouse buttondrag the cell(s) to the new location and release the mouse button.
  4. Select Copy Here as Values Only.

 

Related tips:

Move or copy cells using drag and drop

Display the Auto Fill Options on the fly

Keep the column width when pasting

How to quickly change columns to rows or rows to columns 

Tame your computer – manipulate messages

29 Jan

By default, Outlook only displays the number of unread items in brackets in blue next to the folder name.  But if you want, you can change it to show the total of both read and unread messages, similar to what you might have noticed happens to the Drafts and the For Follow Up folder.

Here’s how:

  1. Right-click the Outlook folder and select Properties.
  2. On the General tab select the Show total number of items radio button.
  3. Press ENTER or click OK.

The setting also applies to your Favorite folders.

The total number of all items will appear in green, rather than blue.

Related tips

Display your flagged messages in a “For Follow Up” folder

How to sort your folder list the way you want it

Tame your computer – cut to the chase

23 Jan

Earlier this month a course delegate asked me whether there was a way to move a bullet point up or down in PowerPoint. Obviously you can use cut and paste, but I remembered there was a nifty keyboard shortcut. But what was it?

So I used my own search page and typed in three words (PowerPoint bullet up) and hey presto … tip 308 came up in the preview of the shortcut archive.

Here’s how:

  1. Put your cursor anywhere in the bulleted text or paragraph you want to move.
  2. Click ALT + SHIFT + UP ARROW to move the bullet point or text up or ALT + SHIFT + DOWN ARROW to move it down.

And I just noticed it also works for pictures in Word.

Tame your computer – drag and drop with Excel

6 Jan

Happy New Year! Let’s make 2018 the year that you learn heaps and have fun doing so. Hopefully this tip is a good start and worth checking out …

As you know, there are many ways to move or copy cells in Excel. Perhaps you use CTRL + XCTRL + C and CTRL + V? Or are you a “right-mouse-clicker”? Perhaps you prefer the Cut and Copy buttons on the Home tab?  Or maybe you use AutoFill to copy values and formulas into adjacent cells?

But did you know you can also move or copy any cell into any worksheet location by using a drag and drop technique?

Here’s how:

Moving cells

  1. Select the cells that are to be moved.
  2. Point to the border of the selection and wait until the mouse pointer appears as a combination of an upward-pointing arrow and four-headed arrow.
  3. Press and hold down the mouse button.
  4. Drag the mouse pointer to the new location.
  5. Release the mouse button.

Copying cells

  1. Select the cells that are to be copied.
  2. Point to the border of the selection and wait until the mouse pointer appears as a combination of an upward-pointing arrow and four-headed arrow.
  3. Press and hold down both CTRL and the mouse button.
  4. Drag the mouse pointer to the new location.
  5. Release the mouse button and CTRL.

You can also move or copy between sheets by holding down the ALT key when dragging the content over the sheet tab.

By the way, the Paste Options button will not be displayed when you use the drag and drop method.

Related tips:
Copy the content of a worksheet

Tame your computer – Best of 2017: top 10 tips

17 Dec

Hello for the last time in 2017.

Here are your favourite, most commented on, tips from the past 12 months to get you inspired for the year ahead. I hope you enjoy them!

  1. Schedule your e-mail message to be sent at your preferred date and time (Microsoft Outlook)
  2. Fast way to start a bulleted or numbered list (Microsoft Word and Outlook)
  3. Reopen recently closed tabs (Chrome, Internet Explorer and Firefox)
  4. Find the best time to schedule a meeting (Microsoft Outlook)
  5. Show changes and comments inline instead of in balloons (Microsoft Word)
  6. Change the colour of public holidays in your calendar (Microsoft Outlook)
  7. Protecting your formulas (Microsoft Excel)
  8. Quick way to paste content of the clipboard into an email message (Microsoft Outlook)
  9. Create a bulleted list in your workbook (Microsoft Excel)
  10. Find email messages sent or received between certain dates (Microsoft Outlook)

Oh, and don’t forget to check out this handy tip before you go off on your holidays; it contains five ways to prevent email overload upon your return from a break.

Wishing you a relaxing holiday season. Remember: Escape isn’t just a button on your keyboard!

Tame your computer – simplify your search

12 Dec

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a tip about how to find email messages sent or received between certain dates. What I wrote still stands but now I’ve found a much easier way. (Thanks for the inspiration, Jackie!)

Here’s how:

  1. Open the Outlook folder you want to search (If you don’t know where you have stored the message, you can skip this step and use step 4.)
  2. Click in the Instant Search box in the top right hand corner or press CTRL + E
  3. Type received: <start date> .. <end date>
  4. If necessary, click on Try searching again in All mail Items at the bottom of the search results to search all other Outlook folders

For example, received:01/07 .. 31/07 will find any email messages that you sent or received in July this year. (No need to specify the current year.) Or received:01/01/2015 .. 01/05/2015 will find emails you sent or received between January and May 2015.

I obviously hope you have a good reason for hanging on to stuff from 2015, especially because various survey statistics show that we waste too much time searching for documents and email messages. To be precise, according to a McKinsey report people spend on average about nine hours per week searching and gathering information! So only keep what you need – and know how to find it.

Related tips:

Find that needle in a haystack
Find even more needles in that haystack
Reduce irrelevant search results
Search for messages sent to a particular person during a certain period of time
Find email messages sent or received between certain dates