Archive | August, 2017

Tame your computer – paste it PDQ

19 Aug

Do you ever copy and paste text from, say, the web or applications such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint into an email message? If so, you probably first open a new email, then click in the body of the message and finally paste what’s on your clipboard. If so, you can save yourself some time …

Here’s how:

  1. Copy the text or figures or file, as normal.
  2. Switch to Outlook. (Remember ALT + TAB or WIN + TAB to flip through your open windows?)
  3. Press CTRL + V.

Whatever you copied in step 1 is automatically included in the body of the new email message. And as mentioned in step 1, this even works when you copy a file, which will add the document as an attachment to the email. That said, if you want to share one or more files with somebody in your organisation it might be better to send a link to the item, rather than an attachment. See tip 431.

Finally, you can obviously do this copying and pasting even smarter using a macro, but I think the method described above is a great time-saver in itself.

But speaking of macros … on 6 – 7 September we run our next two-day Excel VBA course, aimed at anyone who needs to understand and write code that operates within Excel. If you want to learn how to automate repetitive tasks, add new functionality to Excel and format data into reports why not come along? See http://www.roem.co.uk/msexcvba.php for more detail. Oh, and it’s guaranteed to run!

Related tips:
Tip # 419: Preview and flip through your open windows
Tip # 431 : Send links rather than attachments

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Tame your computer – fail-safe your formulas

6 Aug

By default all cells in a worksheet can be modified by anyone who has access to that file.

If you want to prevent other users from changing, moving, or deleting formulas you can make those cells read-only. Other data in the sheet can still be changed.

Here’s how:

  1. Select all cells in the worksheet by clicking on the top left corner of the sheet. (Or click in any empty area and press CTRL + A.)
  2. Right-click anywhere in the sheet and click on Format Cells (or use CTRL+1).
  3. On the Protection tab untick Locked and Hidden.
  4. Click OK or press ENTER.
  5. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click on the Find & Select arrow and click on Formulas.
  6. Right-click any of the selected cells and click on Format Cells (or use CTRL+1).
  7. On the Protection tab tick Locked and Hidden.
  8. Click OK or press ENTER.
  9.  On the Review tab, click Protect Sheet.
  10. Enter a password in the Password to unprotect sheet box and click OK. Re-enter the password in the Confirm Password dialog box.
  11. Click OK or press ENTER.

Step 10 is optional, but if you do not set a password, anybody can remove the protection by simply clicking on the Unprotect Sheet button on the Review tab.  The warning message that pops up even tells you the way to unprotect the sheet.

* Unless stated otherwise, these tips were written for Microsoft Office 2010.